University of California, Riverside

Riverside, CA 92521

Type: Public; Setting: Suburban


Dept of Earth Sciences
University of California Riverside
Earth Science Department
Riverside, CA 92521
Telephone: (951) 827-3182
FAX: (951) 827-3434
E-Mail: david.oglesby@ucr.edu
Website: http://earthscience.ucr.edu

 

Admission Procedures

Degree: B.S.

Contact: Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 1138 Hinderaker Hall, (909) 787-4531
Fall Deadline: January 01, 1999
Spring Deadline: January 01, 1999
Summer Deadline: January 01, 1999

Degree: M.S.

Contact: Carole Carpenter, Student Affairs, (909) 787-3435
Fall Deadline: May 01, 2000
Spring Deadline: December 01, 1999
Summer Deadline: January 01, 1999
Required Letters of Recommendation: 3
Additional Admissions Information: TOEFL of at least 550. Degree Required:
Financial aid consideration deadline for all applicants: January 5; for U.S. citizens, for Fall: May 1; for international applicants, for Fall: February 1. Recommended Courses:

Degree: Ph.D.

Contact: Carole Carpenter, Student Affairs, (909) 787-3435
Fall Deadline: May 01, 2000
Spring Deadline: January 01, 1999
Summer Deadline: January 01, 1999
Required Letters of Recommendation: 3
Additional Admissions Information: TOEFL of at least 550. Degree Required:
Financial aid consideration deadline for all applicants: January 5; for U.S. citizens, for Fall: May 1; for international applicants, for Fall: February 1. Recommended Courses:

Enrollment and Degrees

Degree Requirements

Degree: B.S.

Field camp/course(s): Y
Number of semester hours: 180
Minimum GPA: 2.00
Residence Requirement: Y
Foreign Language: N
Computer Language: N
Comprehensive Exam: N
Thesis/Dissertation: N

Degree: M.S.

Field camp/course(s): N
Number of semester hours: 36
Minimum GPA: 3.00
Residence Requirement: Y
Foreign Language: N
Computer Language: N
Comprehensive Exam: N
Thesis/Dissertation: Y
Other Information: Written thesis proposal and final oral examination.

Degree: Ph.D.

Field camp/course(s): N
Minimum GPA: 3.00
Residence Requirement: Y
Foreign Language: N
Computer Language: N
Comprehensive Exam: N
Thesis/Dissertation: Y
Other Information: Two research proposals, an oral qualifying exam, and a final oral exam are required.

Financial Information (including housing)

Estimated Annual Costs

Tuition (out-of-state):
  • Undergraduate: $9,384.00 per year.
  • Graduate: $9,384.00 per year.
Mandatory Fees:
  • Undergraduate: $3,931.00 per year.
  • Graduate: $4,860.00 per year.
Housing available: Yes
Housing Contact and telephone number: Residence Halls: (909) 787-6350 or http://www.housing.ucr.edu,

Estimated Living Expenses:
  • Room/Board: $5,893.00 per year.
  • Books, etc. for geoscience major: 882.00 per year.

Financial Assistance Available:

Graduate Teaching Assistantships:
Number: 8
Amount: $13,500.00

Graduate Research Assistantships:
Number: 7
Amount: $11,140.00

Tuition waivers are available: Tuition waivers available for fellowship awards.

Research Facilities and Support

Average of department's external support from the following sources:

Federal: $374,905.00 per year.
State: $111,367.00 per year.
Other: $115,254.00 per year.


Computer Facilities:
Computer facilities are available.

Laboratory Facilities:
The UCR Earth Science Department has well-equipped labs for studies in paleontology, geomorphology and Quaternary geology, and computational geophysics. Laboratory facilities include the facilities listed below: Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility, Digital Geologic Map Center, ESMOC (Electromagnetic Studies of the Continent) Facility, GIS and Remote Sensing, Quaternary Geochronology (Luminescence Dating) Laboratory, Morphometics Laboratory, Stable Isotope Laboratory, Tectonophysics Laboratory

Libraries:
UCR's library collections include 1,896,960 bound volumes, 13,316 serial subscriptions and 1,603,000 microforms housed in four facilities: The Tomas Rivera Library (serving the humanities, arts, and social sciences), the Science Library, the Music Library, and the Media Library.

Geologic Area:
From its location near the active boundary of the Pacific plate with the North American plate, University of California, Riverside, gives its faculty and students ready access to a variety of geological, geochemical, and geophysical problems. The campus stands on batholithic rocks at the northern limit of the Peninsular Ranges, where they approach two elements of the Transverse Ranges. The latter are separated from each other by the San Andreas fault. The Peninsular Ranges abut the San Bernardino Mountains to the east, across the San Andreas fault; the San Gabriel Mountains are encroaching from the north over an active thrust system. These three mountain ranges near the Riverside campus preserve different segments of a zoned suite of Mesozoic granitoid plutons. Their motions have grouped together a Pre-Cambrian anorthosite complex, pre-Mesozoic cratonal metasediments, a Mesozoic oceanic greenschist series, Mesozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The pre-plutonic marbles are an important source of cement and lime products. The skarns at the Crestmore Quarry, four miles north of the campus, are world-famous for their diversity of minerals. The active margins of these ranges and their intermontane basins are the sites of Late Cenozoic sediment accumulation, active seismicity, landsliding, hot-spring activity and urban development. They are within the world's best developed regional seismic monitoring network and the focus of "state of the art" earthquake prediction and engineering hazard mitigation. The geomorphology bears a stong imprint from active faulting and landslides. Spectacular ground rupture from the 7.5Ms Landers earthquake provides an ideal area for studying complex surface rupture. Wrightwood, on the east margin of the San Gabriel Mountains, is now a famous example of landslide and mudflow activity. Riverside has grown up beside the Santa Ana River, which has the largest drainage area of any river reaching the southern California coast. The well-developed Santa Ana flood plain begins at the San Andreas fault and extends west as the latest stage of infilling of the Los Angeles Basin, between the western Traverse and Peninsular Ranges. The Late Cenozoic fill of the Los Angeles Basin is a fine example of a marine to non-marine transition and the site of many producing oil fields. Since the residential and commercial development in this semi-arid basin requires water and generates toxic waste, ground-water management is a serious consideration. The Coachella Valley and Salton Trough, southeast of Riverside between the eastern Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, are a tectonic extension of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California, but isolated from it by the Colorado River delta. The trough overlies a leaky transform fault system that has generated active pull-apart basins, Quaternary volcanism, and hydrothermal convection systems. Several areas are already developed for geothermal energy. A locally very-high geothermal gradient produces active metamorphism, reaching lower amphibolite facies within 2500 m of the surface. The Salton Sea geothermal field has active deposition of ore minerals, and its high-salinity fluids may be a mineable resource. Economic interest along the margins of the trough has been enhanced by the nearby discovery of bulk-mineable disseminated gold deposits, such as at Mesquite and Modoc. To the northeast, across the Transverse Ranges, lie the basins and ranges of the Mojave Desert. The ranges expose Precambrian-Triassic sequences of miogeoclinal and marine carbonate platform sequences now complicated by the late Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary tectonics. These ranges have been the site of commercial production of nearly 20 metals, notably gold, silver, iron and tungsten. Precious-metals development is continuing at Randsburg, Castle Mountain and Colosseum. Thirty non-metallic mineral commodities have also been produced, with modern production centered on cement, lime, rare-earth elements, cinder, borates, hectorite and zeolites. The Cenozoic Mojave basins contain a rich record of Oligocene to Recent deposition with enclosed vertebrate fossils that provide the local reference section for the Clarendonian and the type section of the Barstovian North American land-mammals' ages. The modern basins include many fine examples of playas, pediments and alluvial fans. There are also widespread Tertiary to Recent volcanic rocks throughout this desert region.

Faculty Teaching and Research Specialties

  • Cochran, Elizabeth, T, elizabeth.cochran@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 2005, California (Los Angeles), Specialty: Seismology
  • Dieterich, James H, T, (951) 827-2976, james.dieterich@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1968, Yale, Specialty: General Geophysics
  • Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa F, U, (951) 827-2028, larissa@ucrac1.ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1978, Inst of Physics of Earth (Moscow), Research: Microstructural memory of the mineral phases and its role in delineating conditions of extremely high-pressure metamorphism related to the subduction zone environment. Experimental modeling of the ultra-deep metamorphic process and mineral phase transformation utilizing multianvil apparatus. Metamorphic diamonds from eclogitic belts.
  • Droser, Mary L, U, 951-827-3797, mary.droser@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1987, S California, Research: Evolutionary paleoecology; ichnology; the Precambrian-Cambrian and Ordovician radiations; Phanerozoic trends in ecospace utilization; Cambrian and Ordovician of the Great Basin.
  • Elders, Wilfred A, U, wilfred.elders@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1961, Durham, Research: Geothermal-resource investigations, water/rock reactions in hydrothermal systems; tectonics of the Salton Trough; igneous and metamorphic petrology; radon in magma-hydrothermal systems; water quality in the Salton Trough, the creationism-evolution controversy.
  • Funning, Gareth, T, Gareth.Funning@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 2005, Oxford, Specialty: Geodesy
  • Green, II, Harry W, U, (951) 827-4505, harry.green@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1968, California (Los Angeles), Research: Experimental deformation of rocks and minerals at high temperature and pressure; earthquake physics; rheology of the mantle; mechanisms of phase transformations; metastable phase equilibria; ultrahigh pressure metamorphism; nonhydrostatic thermodynamics;
  • Hughes, Nigel C, U, (951) 827-3098, (FAX) 9518274324, nigel.hughes@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1990, Bristol (UK), Research: Field and specimen-based approaches to questions of evolutionary mechanism in the early Phanerozoic. Trilobite paleobiology. Lower Paleozoic paleogeography and tectonics (particularly the early paleozoic history of India and the peri-Gondwanan region), shape restoration of deformed fossils, trace-fossil paleobiology, and clastic sedimentology/stratigraphy.
  • Kendrick, Katherine J, U, (951) 276-4418, kendrick@gps.caltech.edu, Ph.D., 1999, California (Riverside), Research: Tectonic geomorphology; fault activity and interactions in Southern California; pedogenic processes as applied to neotectonics; paleoseismicity
  • Kennedy, Martin J, U, (951) 827-2025, martin.kennedy@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1994, Adelaide, Research: Evolution of the Precambrian biosphere integrating sedimentological and geochemical data with high resolution sequence and isotope stratigraphic techniques. Geochemistry of inorganic-organic interface in marine and terrestrial (soils) systems. Depositional and geochemical studies of marine rocks, black shales, and carbonates.
  • Kooser, Marilyn A, U, (951) 827-3440, (FAX) 9518274324, marilyn.kooser@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1980, California (Riverside), Research: Late Cretaceous-Paleocene biostratigraphy; Paleocene stratigraphy in the Transverse Ranges; sedimentary facies in deep-sea fans.
  • Lee, Tien-Chang, T, (951) 827-4506, tien.lee@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1973, S California, Research: Hydrogeological studies/modeling, artificial recharge; modeling and inversion/analytical, numerical (finite-element analysis); shallow geophysical studies/hydrogeological, environmental, archaeological; tectonics/fault zone characterization, basin configuration; terrestrial heat transfer/geothermal.
  • Love, Gordon, T, gordon.love@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1995, Strathclyde, Specialty: Organic Geochemistry
  • McKibben, Michael A, T, (951) 827-3444, michael.mckibben@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1984, Penn State, Research: Geochemical kinetics of mineral dissolution and oxidation; geology and geochemistry of mineral and energy resources, water-rock interaction in hydrothermal systems; sulfur geochemistry in volcanoes and lakes.
  • Minnich, Richard A, U, (951) 827-5515, richard.minnich@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1978, California (Los Angeles), Research: Fire ecology of southern California, Baja California, and temperate Mexico; exotic-plant invasions; climate change.
  • Morton, Douglas M, T, (951) 276-6397, scamp@ucrac1.ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1966, California (Los Angeles), Research: Regional geology of southern California; tectonics; petrologic aspects of basement rocks of the Peninsular and Transverse Ranges; GIS applications to geologic history of southern California.
  • Murphy, Michael A, T, michael.murphy@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1954, California (Los Angeles), Specialty: Paleostratigraphy
  • Oglesby, David D, T, (951) 827-2036, david.oglesby@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1999, California (Santa Barbara), Research: Earthquake physics (in particular, the effects of fault geometry and stress inhomogeneity on earthquake dynamics), computational models of faulting, wave propagation, and earthquake ground motion; strong motion seismology.
  • Park, Stephen K, U, (951) 827-4501, magneto@ucrmt.ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1984, MIT, Research: Magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the creation and destruction of crust; applications of inversion theory; detection of contaminants in the subsurface; electromagnetic phenomena associated with earthquakes.
  • Sadler, Peter M, T, (951) 827-5616, (FAX) 9518274324, peter.sadler@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1973, Bristol (UK), Research: Quantitative biostratigraphy, rates and scaling laws of geologic processes; completeness of the stratigraphic record; synorogenic sedimentation.
  • Scott, Thomas A, T, (951) 827-5115, thomas.scott@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1987, California (Berkeley), Research: Biogeography; conservation biology; wildlife management.
  • Williams, Alan E, U, (951) 827-4611, alan.williams@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1980, Brown, Research: pfarquharson@miracosta.edu
  • Woodburne, Michael O, T, (909) 787-5028, michael.woodburne@ucr.edu, Ph.D., 1966, California (Berkeley), Research: Accuracy in chronostratigraphy; evolution and biostratigraphy of Cretaceous and Tertiary-aged mammals of the southern hemisphere, especially Australia, Antarctica, and South America; Cenozoic biochronology of fossil mammals of North America; historical geology, stratigraphy, paleontology, and tectonic analysis of Tertiary-aged terranes of southern California.

Departmental Geoscience Specialties

Courses Taught:

Undergraduate:
General Geology, Environmental Geosciences, Field Geology, Geomorphology, Mineralogy & Crystallography, Igneous Petrology, Sedimentary Geology, Sedimentology & Stratigraphy, General Geochemistry, General Geophysics, Exploration Geophysics, Paleobiology/Evolution, Physical Geography, Paleontology

Graduate:
Geomorphology, Igneous Petrology, General Geochemistry, Low-temperature Geochemistry, Stable Isotopes, General Geophysics, Exploration Geophysics, Paleobiology/Evolution, Physical Geography, Paleontology

Degree Specialties:
General Geology, Field Geology, General Geochemistry, Low-temperature Geochemistry, Stable Isotopes, General Geophysics, Exploration Geophysics, Seismology, Paleobiology/Evolution, Physical Geography, Paleontology

Historical Department Enrollment and Degrees Granted

Enrollment and Degrees Granted data are as reported by the department. Empty cells indicate no data reported for that year.

Category1974-19751975-19761976-19771977-19781978-19791979-19801980-19811981-19821982-19831983-19841984-19851985-19861986-19871987-19881988-19891989-19901990-19911991-19921992-19931993-19941994-19951995-19961996-19971997-19981998-19991999-20002000-20012001-20022002-20032003-20042004-20052005-20062006-20072007-20082008-20092009-20102010-20112011-20122012-2013
Undergraduate Enrollment647966636048495762172225303345301734363027252124182730515151
Graduate Enrollment22272833293031242438191819192832252425192325245093846342153
Bachelor's Granted97610213126856822482251413
Master's Granted124753412712333310678
Doctorates Granted11332212169224